My Blog

Posts for: September, 2017

By Ronald L. Schoepflin, D.D.S.
September 29, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease   plaque  
TheSecrettoPreventingGumDisease-ControlBacterialPlaque

Here’s a sobering statistic: you have a 50/50 chance over your lifetime for developing periodontal (gum) disease. And it’s much more serious than irritated gums: if not treated aggressively you could experience bone loss, which can not only lead to tooth loss but actually increases your risk of heart attack and stroke.

Initially, you may not notice any symptoms unless you know what to look for: mainly red and puffy gums that frequently bleed during brushing and flossing. As the infection advances into the underlying support structures that hold teeth in place you may also notice receding gums (moving away from your teeth causing them to look longer), pus around the gums or lingering bad breath or taste. And one or more loose teeth are a definite sign the supporting structures have weakened severely.

So, how does gum disease happen? It starts with bacteria. Your mouth contains millions of these and other microorganisms, most of which are friendly and even beneficial. Unfortunately, a fraction of them can infect and harm tissues like the gums and underlying bone. Your mouth’s defenses can normally handle them if their numbers remain low. But a bacterial population explosion can quickly overwhelm those defenses.

Bacteria are like any other life form: they need a secure environment and food. Disease-causing bacteria establish the former by utilizing proteins and other components of saliva to form a sticky biofilm on teeth known as plaque. Within the safe haven of dental plaque bacteria quickly multiply and form a complex and concentrated ecosystem feeding on remnant food particles, especially sugar and other carbohydrates.

The key to gum disease prevention (as well as treatment) is to deprive bacteria of their home and food source by removing plaque and its more hardened form calculus (tartar). You can manage plaque buildup by brushing and flossing daily, seeing your dentist regularly for cleanings to remove any remaining hard-to-reach plaque and calculus, and eating a nutritious diet with fewer sweets or other carbohydrate-rich snacks.

You can further lower your disease risk by avoiding smoking and other tobacco products and moderating your consumption of alcohol. And be sure to see your dentist as soon as possible if you notice any signs of infection with your gums. Taking these steps can help you avoid gum disease’s destructiveness and help preserve a healthy and attractive smile.

If you would like more information on gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Ronald L. Schoepflin, D.D.S.
September 19, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Dental Lasers  

As research and knowledge expands, dental technology and techniques continue to evolve. One of the most cutting-edge ways to treat dental laserdental conditions is through the use of a laser tool that uses a tiny concentrated beam of light to accurately and efficiently treat problems like cavities. Dr. Ronald Schoepflin uses laser technology in his dental office in Port Orchard, Washington. Learn how lasers are used in dental procedures here.

Benefits of lasers

Laser technology is an extremely precise method of treating dental conditions. Research has shown that the light emitted by a laser is absorbed easily by the minerals in the teeth, making it highly effective for several different procedures.

Lasers for gum tissue

The lasers for the soft tissues in the mouth are applied in a variety of beneficial ways. Laser therapy is often used to treat gum disease by stimulating new growth of healthy tissue. If your smile shows more gummy areas than is aesthetically normal, your Port Orchard dentist can remove a small amount to expose the areas of the teeth that the excess gum tissue has been hiding behind it.

Lasers for tooth and bone structures

In many cases, your Port Orchard dentist can use a laser to detect evidence of cavity formation. If any cavities are found, the laser can also be used to remove decay and prepare a tooth for a cavity filling instead of needing a local anesthetic. This cuts out a step in the process and providing less discomfort and a quicker procedure for you. Dental lasers can also be used cosmetically to reshape abnormal tooth structure or prepare the surface of teeth for bonding or veneers.

If you'd like to learn more about how lasers can enhance your dental health, contact Schoepflin Dental Excellence in Port Orchard, Washington to make an appointment today!


By Ronald L. Schoepflin, D.D.S.
September 14, 2017
Category: Oral Health
ActorDavidRamseySaysDontForgettoFloss

Can you have healthy teeth and still have gum disease? Absolutely! And if you don’t believe us, just ask actor David Ramsey. The cast member of TV hits such as Dexter and Arrow said in a recent interview that up to the present day, he has never had a single cavity. Yet at a routine dental visit during his college years, Ramsey’s dentist pointed out how easily his gums bled during the exam. This was an early sign of periodontal (gum) disease, the dentist told him.

“I learned that just because you don’t have cavities, doesn’t mean you don’t have periodontal disease,” Ramsey said.

Apparently, Ramsey had always been very conscientious about brushing his teeth but he never flossed them.

“This isn’t just some strange phenomenon that exists just in my house — a lot of people who brush don’t really floss,” he noted.

Unfortunately, that’s true — and we’d certainly like to change it. So why is flossing so important?

Oral diseases such as tooth decay and periodontal disease often start when dental plaque, a bacteria-laden film that collects on teeth, is allowed to build up. These sticky deposits can harden into a substance called tartar or calculus, which is irritating to the gums and must be removed during a professional teeth cleaning.

Brushing teeth is one way to remove soft plaque, but it is not effective at reaching bacteria or food debris between teeth. That’s where flossing comes in. Floss can fit into spaces that your toothbrush never reaches. In fact, if you don’t floss, you’re leaving about a third to half of your tooth surfaces unclean — and, as David Ramsey found out, that’s a path to periodontal disease.

Since then, however, Ramsey has become a meticulous flosser, and he proudly notes that the long-ago dental appointment “was the last we heard of any type of gum disease.”

Let that be the same for you! Just remember to brush and floss, eat a good diet low in sugar, and come in to the dental office for regular professional cleanings.

If you would like more information on flossing or periodontal disease, please contact us today to schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Understanding Gum (Periodontal) Disease.”